Information on Restricted Visitor Policy and Response to COVID-19

Doylestown Health's COVID-19 vaccine offering is restricted by PA Department of Health guidelines.  Find the latest information regarding Doylestown Health's response to COVID, including testing, visitor policies and more. Learn more

Preadmission Testing Announcement

As of Monday, January 25th, all preadmission testing -- with the exception of cardiac and vascular surgeries -- will be performed in the Ambulatory Center and those  patients should park in A4.

Heart Attack Symptoms in Young Women

Health Articles |
Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

One of the most recognizable symptoms of a heart attack is chest pain. However, this common sign may not apply to all. Heart attack symptoms are not the same across the board. In fact, young women may not experience chest pain, according to a new study by the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine titled Sex Differences in Acute Coronary Syndrome Symptom Presentation in Young Patients.

The study found that one in five women, ages 55 and younger, did not experience chest pain during their heart attack. Though chest pain was the most common symptom of a heart attack in both men and women, it is important to understand that it is not the only telltale sign.

Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

The American Heart Association identified the following heart attack symptoms commonly experienced by women:

  • Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of your chest. It lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and comes back.
  • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs such as breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.
  • As with men, women's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain.

Source: American Heart Association

To recognize the signs of a heart attack in women, watch Go Red For Women's "Just a Little Heart Attack".

Source: Go Red for Women

Find a Cardiologist

About Doylestown Health's Heart & Vascular Services

Expert cardiologists and cardiac surgeons assist patients and physicians with managing risk factors for heart disease, offer advanced treatment options and provide outstanding emergency cardiac care. Doylestown Hospital’s accredited Chest Pain Center is fully prepared to treat cardiac emergencies around the clock, focusing on rapid diagnosis and effective treatment. The multidisciplinary team at the Woodall Center for Heart and Vascular Care is dedicated to providing the highest level of quality care and patient safety.

Blog Posts

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update from Doylestown Health
Information on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

(Updated 1/22/21) Doylestown Health is coordinating with federal, state and local agencies to prevent the spread of potential COVID-19 (Coronavirus).

A Day in the Life of an ER Doc
A Day in the Life of an ER Doc

The life of an ER doc is never dull--especially during a pandemic. Step into the ER with Doylestown Health Emergency Medicine physician Brenda Foley, MD.

Man holding belly
IBS vs. IBD: What Is the Difference?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very different gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Learn the differences.

View All Articles

Upcoming Classes and Events

For more information or to find a doctor